spagetti's Activity (8309)

  • spagetti
    spagetti added a new comment in
    I'm so glad I didn't miss the cutoff for this giveaway! Sounds very interesting. Good luck everyone.
    10 days ago
  • felicisowl
    felicisowl added a new comment in
    Tiangong-radar-image-720x720-mediumI'm glad that no one was hurt, but I wonder if that'll stay the same in the long run, with all of the space debris + uncontrolled substances in our atmosphere at the moment. I really hope that the debris doesn't hit the International Space Station, and that we do get to explore space a bit more! It would be a shame to be grounded, after all of the hard work in the 'sixties and seventies.
    16 days ago
  • felicisowl
    felicisowl's book review was featured in The School for Good and Evil.
    Dazzling and brilliantly executed, The School for Good and Evil manages to be both heartwarming and seriously sweet. It's a middle-grade novel written by Soman Chainani, and it utilizes fairy-tale tropes to excellent effect –– it had me giggling for a while, because this is exactly the type of light-hearted, snappy humor that always makes me laugh. Sophie and Agatha, the two protagonists, represent why teenage girls shouldn't be taken lightly––they are characters that grow on you, and they are characters that grow with you. Like Shrek and other fairy-tale adaptations, The School for Good and Evil stays true to its roots. It's true that female villains are often the most delightfully wicked of all, and I especially liked how earnest Sophie's very turbulent, atypically teenage emotions were exploited––it was very real, and her motives were explained in a way that made sense. I think I would consider this a "light read," because it was coming-of-age and just very adorable, but––there was a lot of surprisingly hidden depth, lurking under the surface. Digging up the history and the world-building was enlightening, and the writing delves into answering some philosophical questions: What is the true nature of friendship? What even is "good and evil," exactly? What choices really matter in the long-run? We don't live in a world with castles and brambly forests and fairy-tale heroines, but that's the point––we can apply the lessons and questions from The School for Good and Evil and use it in our own worlds, in our own surroundings, in our own situations. I will tell you this: by far, the most important lesson that the School for Good and Evil strived to teach is that your nature is self-determined. We are not inherently good or evil, and we do not have to be what people expect us to be. We are more than capable of breaking out of our molds, and blazing our own paths into the future––in the real world, we can't travel back in time, but there is always (always!) room for change inside our souls.
    17 days ago
  • felicisowl
    felicisowl added a book review.
    Dazzling and brilliantly executed, The School for Good and Evil manages to be both heartwarming and seriously sweet. It's a middle-grade novel written by Soman Chainani, and it utilizes fairy-tale tropes to excellent effect –– it had me giggling for a while, because this is exactly the type of light-hearted, snappy humor that always makes me laugh. Sophie and Agatha, the two protagonists, represent why teenage girls shouldn't be taken lightly––they are characters that grow on you, and they are characters that grow with you. Like Shrek and other fairy-tale adaptations, The School for Good and Evil stays true to its roots. It's true that female villains are often the most delightfully wicked of all, and I especially liked how earnest Sophie's very turbulent, atypically teenage emotions were exploited––it was very real, and her motives were explained in a way that made sense. I think I would consider this a "light read," because it was coming-of-age and just very adorable, but––there was a lot of surprisingly hidden depth, lurking under the surface. Digging up the history and the world-building was enlightening, and the writing delves into answering some philosophical questions: What is the true nature of friendship? What even is "good and evil," exactly? What choices really matter in the long-run? We don't live in a world with castles and brambly forests and fairy-tale heroines, but that's the point––we can apply the lessons and questions from The School for Good and Evil and use it in our own worlds, in our own surroundings, in our own situations. I will tell you this: by far, the most important lesson that the School for Good and Evil strived to teach is that your nature is self-determined. We are not inherently good or evil, and we do not have to be what people expect us to be. We are more than capable of breaking out of our molds, and blazing our own paths into the future––in the real world, we can't travel back in time, but there is always (always!) room for change inside our souls.
    17 days ago
  • spagetti
    spagetti added a new comment in
    I am a huge fan of Brandon Mull. I would go nuits for this and promise to pass along to my friends too once I'm finioshed reading it!
    About 1 month ago
  • ocelot
    ocelot added a new comment in
    I would love to get this book for my library! Because it takes place in a hospital setting, I can relate to what happens in the book. I also love the idea of kids getting together at midnight in the hospital to achieve great things. This sounds like a very interesting and out-of-the-ordinary type of book, and I would absolutely love to receive it! Thank you very much, DOGObooks, for these free giveaways!
    About 1 month ago
  • ocelot
    ocelot's movie review was featured in Black Panther.
    Vfkj7labompsdfrmuuqxrbc6yp0Black Panther. The King of Wakanda, a thought-to-be third world country situated in the midst of one of Africa's forests. There could be nothing further from the truth. Wakanda is a high-tech, successfully functioning city, probably doing better than any other city in the US, or other developed countries. Their secret? Vibranium. It's the most powerful metal in the world, and can reflect bullets, absorb energy from bombs, and heal the wounded. After the death of King T'Challa's father, he steps up to take the throne. But things are not as easy as they seem. There are people that would do anything to steal the vibranium from Wakanda, and, even worse, attempt to take the throne and show the world just how powerful they are. But, will King T'Challa be able to stop them in time? Or will he soon turn out to be just as weak as any other citizen in the rest of the world? Filled with thrilling action, nail-biters, and cliff-hangers, this movie is fantastic to watch with a box of popcorn and some warm blankets. I recommend this movie to anyone that likes Marvel's works, or action and adventure genres.
    About 1 month ago
  • ocelot
    ocelot added a movie review.
    Vfkj7labompsdfrmuuqxrbc6yp0Black Panther. The King of Wakanda, a thought-to-be third world country situated in the midst of one of Africa's forests. There could be nothing further from the truth. Wakanda is a high-tech, successfully functioning city, probably doing better than any other city in the US, or other developed countries. Their secret? Vibranium. It's the most powerful metal in the world, and can reflect bullets, absorb energy from bombs, and heal the wounded. After the death of King T'Challa's father, he steps up to take the throne. But things are not as easy as they seem. There are people that would do anything to steal the vibranium from Wakanda, and, even worse, attempt to take the throne and show the world just how powerful they are. But, will King T'Challa be able to stop them in time? Or will he soon turn out to be just as weak as any other citizen in the rest of the world? Filled with thrilling action, nail-biters, and cliff-hangers, this movie is fantastic to watch with a box of popcorn and some warm blankets. I recommend this movie to anyone that likes Marvel's works, or action and adventure genres.
    About 1 month ago
  • ocelot
    ocelot has watched this movie.
    About 1 month ago
  • gman
    gman is reading this book.
    About 1 month ago

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