felicisowl's Activity (6380)

  • turtlenicole
    turtlenicole added a news bookmark.
    Though many artists specialize in cityscapes very few create masterpieces as detailed and intricate as those sketched by Stephen Wiltshire. Even more impressive is that each mon...
    8 days ago
  • turtlenicole
    turtlenicole added a news bookmark.
    Experts estimate that by the year 2050, the world’s population will swell from the current 7.3 billion to over 9.5 billion, with just nine countries accounting for half the grow...
    8 days ago
  • turtlenicole
    turtlenicole added a news bookmark.
    With memories of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, which ravaged Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico in 2017, still fresh in their minds, residents of the US Atlantic and Gulf Coa...
    8 days ago
  • turtlenicole
    turtlenicole added a news bookmark.
    In case you missed it, April 5 was National Caramel Day. To mark the holiday, which honors the soft sugary confection, August Storck KG, manufacturer of the popular caramel-flav...
    8 days ago
  • felicisowl
    felicisowl added a new comment in
    Tiangong-radar-image-720x720-mediumI'm glad that no one was hurt, but I wonder if that'll stay the same in the long run, with all of the space debris + uncontrolled substances in our atmosphere at the moment. I really hope that the debris doesn't hit the International Space Station, and that we do get to explore space a bit more! It would be a shame to be grounded, after all of the hard work in the 'sixties and seventies.
    15 days ago
  • felicisowl
    felicisowl's book review was featured in The School for Good and Evil.
    Dazzling and brilliantly executed, The School for Good and Evil manages to be both heartwarming and seriously sweet. It's a middle-grade novel written by Soman Chainani, and it utilizes fairy-tale tropes to excellent effect –– it had me giggling for a while, because this is exactly the type of light-hearted, snappy humor that always makes me laugh. Sophie and Agatha, the two protagonists, represent why teenage girls shouldn't be taken lightly––they are characters that grow on you, and they are characters that grow with you. Like Shrek and other fairy-tale adaptations, The School for Good and Evil stays true to its roots. It's true that female villains are often the most delightfully wicked of all, and I especially liked how earnest Sophie's very turbulent, atypically teenage emotions were exploited––it was very real, and her motives were explained in a way that made sense. I think I would consider this a "light read," because it was coming-of-age and just very adorable, but––there was a lot of surprisingly hidden depth, lurking under the surface. Digging up the history and the world-building was enlightening, and the writing delves into answering some philosophical questions: What is the true nature of friendship? What even is "good and evil," exactly? What choices really matter in the long-run? We don't live in a world with castles and brambly forests and fairy-tale heroines, but that's the point––we can apply the lessons and questions from The School for Good and Evil and use it in our own worlds, in our own surroundings, in our own situations. I will tell you this: by far, the most important lesson that the School for Good and Evil strived to teach is that your nature is self-determined. We are not inherently good or evil, and we do not have to be what people expect us to be. We are more than capable of breaking out of our molds, and blazing our own paths into the future––in the real world, we can't travel back in time, but there is always (always!) room for change inside our souls.
    16 days ago
  • felicisowl
    felicisowl added a book review.
    Dazzling and brilliantly executed, The School for Good and Evil manages to be both heartwarming and seriously sweet. It's a middle-grade novel written by Soman Chainani, and it utilizes fairy-tale tropes to excellent effect –– it had me giggling for a while, because this is exactly the type of light-hearted, snappy humor that always makes me laugh. Sophie and Agatha, the two protagonists, represent why teenage girls shouldn't be taken lightly––they are characters that grow on you, and they are characters that grow with you. Like Shrek and other fairy-tale adaptations, The School for Good and Evil stays true to its roots. It's true that female villains are often the most delightfully wicked of all, and I especially liked how earnest Sophie's very turbulent, atypically teenage emotions were exploited––it was very real, and her motives were explained in a way that made sense. I think I would consider this a "light read," because it was coming-of-age and just very adorable, but––there was a lot of surprisingly hidden depth, lurking under the surface. Digging up the history and the world-building was enlightening, and the writing delves into answering some philosophical questions: What is the true nature of friendship? What even is "good and evil," exactly? What choices really matter in the long-run? We don't live in a world with castles and brambly forests and fairy-tale heroines, but that's the point––we can apply the lessons and questions from The School for Good and Evil and use it in our own worlds, in our own surroundings, in our own situations. I will tell you this: by far, the most important lesson that the School for Good and Evil strived to teach is that your nature is self-determined. We are not inherently good or evil, and we do not have to be what people expect us to be. We are more than capable of breaking out of our molds, and blazing our own paths into the future––in the real world, we can't travel back in time, but there is always (always!) room for change inside our souls.
    16 days ago
  • editor
    editor is now following epicguy100.
    18 days ago
  • editor
    editor replied to a comment in
    Leona_helmsley_cropped_mug-mediumThank YOU! That really made our day!
    22 days ago
  • turtlenicole
    turtlenicole added a news bookmark.
    When the ashes from a December 2014 eruption of a submarine volcano created a 400-foot (120-meter) island in the South Pacific Kingdom of Tonga experts predicted it would last a...
    23 days ago

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First to CommentThird to CommentFirst BookFirst Favorite News ArticleFirst Favorite WebsiteCreate an AvatarWrote First Book ReviewWrote 10 Book ReviewsWrote 25 Book ReviewsWrote 50 Book ReviewsFirst MovieWrote First Movie ReviewWrote 10 Movie ReviewsWrote 25 Movie ReviewsJoined National Geographic Kids Book ClubJoined Mac Kids Book ClubJoined Summer Reading 2015

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