pipermc11's Activity (2117)

  • pipermc11
    pipermc11's book review was featured in Lucky Broken Girl.
    Ruthie is just a young girl living in New York City, trying to achieve the American dream until those dreams are put on the line after a car accident that leaves her very injured. The story follows Ruthie's journey to recovery, forgiveness, hope, and love. I loved this book so so much for not only the thought provoking bits and life lessons, but for the melting pots of cultures that were conveyed. Because this is largely based off of the author's own experience, it has a personal touch that couldn't have been added otherwise. First of all, the life lessons and thought provoking bits. I loved Ruthie and I think anyone could sympathize with her hopefulness and kindness. I also loved how her recovery process was used in such a way that Ruthie had to grow up fast and learned so many life lessons like forgiveness, following your dreams, etc. The one complaint I would have is that I felt that sometimes, because Ruthie was bedridden, the story dragged a little. I also loved the other main component I took away from the book, which is that America is a melting pot. One of her friends was Indian, another was fluent in French and English and was from Belgium, their apartment neighbor was from Mexico, and Ruthie's extended family (all Cuban) were featured heavily. I also loved how whenever these cultures were brought up, they were always very warm and celebrated their culture (her parents dancing, their culture of food, her friend's mother making pastries, etc.) and I felt like I learned something about each of the cultures. Ultimately, this book showed one girl's story of recovery while learning about forgiveness and hope, and was able to celebrate cultures from all over the world without making the book all about culture/religion. The book shows that you should always follow your dreams because in America, it's a melting pot- anyone can achieve anything.
    About 1 month ago
  • pipermc11
    pipermc11 added a book review.
    Ruthie is just a young girl living in New York City, trying to achieve the American dream until those dreams are put on the line after a car accident that leaves her very injured. The story follows Ruthie's journey to recovery, forgiveness, hope, and love. I loved this book so so much for not only the thought provoking bits and life lessons, but for the melting pots of cultures that were conveyed. Because this is largely based off of the author's own experience, it has a personal touch that couldn't have been added otherwise. First of all, the life lessons and thought provoking bits. I loved Ruthie and I think anyone could sympathize with her hopefulness and kindness. I also loved how her recovery process was used in such a way that Ruthie had to grow up fast and learned so many life lessons like forgiveness, following your dreams, etc. The one complaint I would have is that I felt that sometimes, because Ruthie was bedridden, the story dragged a little. I also loved the other main component I took away from the book, which is that America is a melting pot. One of her friends was Indian, another was fluent in French and English and was from Belgium, their apartment neighbor was from Mexico, and Ruthie's extended family (all Cuban) were featured heavily. I also loved how whenever these cultures were brought up, they were always very warm and celebrated their culture (her parents dancing, their culture of food, her friend's mother making pastries, etc.) and I felt like I learned something about each of the cultures. Ultimately, this book showed one girl's story of recovery while learning about forgiveness and hope, and was able to celebrate cultures from all over the world without making the book all about culture/religion. The book shows that you should always follow your dreams because in America, it's a melting pot- anyone can achieve anything.
    About 1 month ago
  • pipermc11
    pipermc11 has read this book.
    By Ruth Behar
    About 1 month ago
  • spinnypeeps
    spinnypeeps's book review was featured in Throne of Glass.
    Undefeated by the Salt Mines of Endovier, Celaena Sardothien has returned to Adarlan, the prince’s champion to compete for the position of the royal assassin. If she emerges victorious, she Crown prince has offered her freedom at the price of four years of service to the malicious King of Adarlan. But it is not the competition that worries her one bit-- it’s the evil that lies at the heart of the castle that is killing her opponents left and right. With the help of the gruff Captain Westfall and the bewitching playboy, Prince Dorian, will she finally set her inherent beast free before it’s too late? After reading a review by fany13 on DogoBooks, I finally managed to read this fantastic Young Adult book by Sarah J. Maas. I admit that at first I hesitated to read it-- Celaena seemed evil to me. How could the author possibly justify the actions of the most notorious assassin of Adarlan? I opened the book cover with completely cynical eyes, expecting to hate the main character. At first, I did. She was narcissistic, haughty, ruthless-- or so I thought. As I read on, I discovered that Celaena was one of--if not the most--incredible, inspiring, and 3-Dimensional characters that I’ve ever encountered in literature. Sarah J. Maas spins an incredibly intricate web in “The Throne of Glass”, which you don’t want to miss. I can confidently rate this book five stars. Lovers of Rick Riordan, Brandon Mull, Marie Lu, and Veronica Roth will enjoy this thrill of a read!
    2 months ago
  • spinnypeeps
    spinnypeeps added a book review.
    Undefeated by the Salt Mines of Endovier, Celaena Sardothien has returned to Adarlan, the prince’s champion to compete for the position of the royal assassin. If she emerges victorious, she Crown prince has offered her freedom at the price of four years of service to the malicious King of Adarlan. But it is not the competition that worries her one bit-- it’s the evil that lies at the heart of the castle that is killing her opponents left and right. With the help of the gruff Captain Westfall and the bewitching playboy, Prince Dorian, will she finally set her inherent beast free before it’s too late? After reading a review by fany13 on DogoBooks, I finally managed to read this fantastic Young Adult book by Sarah J. Maas. I admit that at first I hesitated to read it-- Celaena seemed evil to me. How could the author possibly justify the actions of the most notorious assassin of Adarlan? I opened the book cover with completely cynical eyes, expecting to hate the main character. At first, I did. She was narcissistic, haughty, ruthless-- or so I thought. As I read on, I discovered that Celaena was one of--if not the most--incredible, inspiring, and 3-Dimensional characters that I’ve ever encountered in literature. Sarah J. Maas spins an incredibly intricate web in “The Throne of Glass”, which you don’t want to miss. I can confidently rate this book five stars. Lovers of Rick Riordan, Brandon Mull, Marie Lu, and Veronica Roth will enjoy this thrill of a read!
    2 months ago
  • pipermc11
    pipermc11 added a new comment in
    This book really intrigued me because it reminds me of Peter Pan and involves some of my favorite elements of a story combined, astrology and magic!
    3 months ago
  • pipermc11
    pipermc11's book review was featured in Warren the 13th and the Whispering Woods: A Novel.
    Warren the 13th and the Whispering Woods is a creepily enchanting story. I liked that it jumped right into the story directly from the last novel, so that there wasn't a gap in between. Tania del Rio did a great job of giving some context from the last book and transitioning to The Whispering Woods so that those who didn't read the first book won't be confused. The walking hotel was definitely one of the enchanting aspects of the novel, and I was happy to see Warren's progression from the last book to be happier. I also loved how his friends picked up people from all around the country to join the hotel. I loved how each setting (either the hotel, the forest, etc.) felt different from each other and had a distinct setting. I felt like the book did a good job with having multiple plot lines, yet it didn't feel rushed or strange. I also loved the pictures in both books, so it can be appealing to elementary age kids but still provide a valuable story for middle schoolers. I would definitely recommend this to elementary age to middle school age, and it was a great read!
    5 months ago
  • pipermc11
    pipermc11 added a book review.
    Warren the 13th and the Whispering Woods is a creepily enchanting story. I liked that it jumped right into the story directly from the last novel, so that there wasn't a gap in between. Tania del Rio did a great job of giving some context from the last book and transitioning to The Whispering Woods so that those who didn't read the first book won't be confused. The walking hotel was definitely one of the enchanting aspects of the novel, and I was happy to see Warren's progression from the last book to be happier. I also loved how his friends picked up people from all around the country to join the hotel. I loved how each setting (either the hotel, the forest, etc.) felt different from each other and had a distinct setting. I felt like the book did a good job with having multiple plot lines, yet it didn't feel rushed or strange. I also loved the pictures in both books, so it can be appealing to elementary age kids but still provide a valuable story for middle schoolers. I would definitely recommend this to elementary age to middle school age, and it was a great read!
    5 months ago
  • pipermc11
    pipermc11 has read this book.
    5 months ago
  • spinnypeeps
    spinnypeeps added a book review.
    "Off with his head," the first quote that we juxtapose next to the heartless Queen of Hearts, and the quote that the book ends in. She seems like a merciless sociopath, cutting off heads if the roses aren't red. The only reason? Because she's from Wonderland. And why is the Mad Hatter so mad? Because he's from Wonderland. At least, those are the only explanations that we allow ourselves to believe in. "Heartless" by Marissa Meyer explores the concepts of the nuanced grey scale of good and evil, and I think her theme is that all humans are fallible, and that no one person is to blame. Watch Catherine as she morphs from the starry-eyed girl who dreamed of impossibilities to one of the most iconic villains in literature history. Get strangled in Cath's constant struggles and get ready to get your heart wrenched out of your chest. Watch yourself become entangled in the constantly resetting wars in the Land of Chess, and watch even the most innocent nursery rhymes become a haunting tale to grab onto your nightmare until the end of Time. And most of all, come to understand why the Queen of Hearts would cut off heads for the sake of keeping her roses red. If you don't read this book, I guarantee you will miss out.
    5 months ago

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