icecream13's Activity (160)

  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic has watched this movie.
    1 day ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in Dragon Pearl.
    *NO CRITICAL SPOILERS* (Entirely subjective) Dragon Pearl is about a fantasy world taking place in space. And yes, I picked it up because it said, "Rick Riordan Presents" on the cover. In this world, humans coexist with "supernaturals" in space and the summary above pretty much gives the rest of the synopsis. A critical review: Kim Min is the protagonist of the book. As far as characters go, she's one of the most interesting in the whole book. The idea of a supernatural fox-pseudo human going to space to save her brother while is such an enticing premise that is fully realized in this book. She possesses many shades of grey that make the reader question her moral values and the decisions she makes, going so far as to have them decide whether she can even be considered a good character in the first place. She is determined, rebellious, and willing to do anything, even abuse her shapeshifting abilities to pose as another individual. She deceives her closest friends and infiltrates a private room to find information about where her brother (the main motive) has gone. The reader's choice to decide whether or not she can be forgiven gives the book a more immersive feel to it and makes her character more relatable. The most interesting thing about her is her grey shades that leave the reader One of the book's biggest strengths is its worldbuilding elements. The world itself is full of supernatural creatures and is so fully realized it feels almost real. Part of the reason for this is the fact that it's able to reflect real-world prejudices in a realistic manner that mirrors prejudices of our own. In this book, fox species are frowned upon as deceptive and cunning, and while it's a nice nod to Zootopia (ha), it manages to be different from that with its sci-fi theming and setting that takes place in the confines of a military-like spaceship. The Korean mythology that is implemented in this futuristic setting feels so incredibly creative and mind-blowing at times, as the parallels between the legends and the events of the book are so cleverly executed. However, there are some serious criticisms that I feel should be addressed about this book. The book seems to drag on and on forever and is riddled with poor pacing. Lots of patience is needed to go through this book as the "high-octane thrills" that are promised on the cover only come occasionally. This is likely due to the setting, which is restricted within the spaceship. Although Kim Min has lots of drive behind her, the rate at which the goals themselves are accomplished sometimes happens at a staggeringly slow pace. The characters spend lots of their time expressing their opinions on previous events in the book or spend a long time contemplating what to do. And when the destination is finally reached, it doesn't feel fulfilling. The brother Kim spends so many pages looking for is actually in the book for only twenty pages/ The first and last act of the book is where it truly manages to shine as that's where it feels most appropriately paced. Some side plots also unnecessarily intrude in the main story. Kim's two best friends, Haneul and Sujin, are not expanded to their full potential and while they start off strong, get less and less developed as the book drags on. The villain also feels one-dimensional at times, with the generic "I'll take over the world using this epic powerful item" trope. Even Jun, Kim's brother, struggles as a character with the same problems and lack of a proper arc. Jang, the ghost out for revenge, is the only other character that actually feels fleshed out enough. Overall, this book is good. That much is true. It has a fully-realized world and protagonist that is hindered by poor pacing and side characters. But hey. That's just my opinion. If you're patient, go enough and read it. 3/5.
    6 days ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic added a book review.
    *NO CRITICAL SPOILERS* (Entirely subjective) Dragon Pearl is about a fantasy world taking place in space. And yes, I picked it up because it said, "Rick Riordan Presents" on the cover. In this world, humans coexist with "supernaturals" in space and the summary above pretty much gives the rest of the synopsis. A critical review: Kim Min is the protagonist of the book. As far as characters go, she's one of the most interesting in the whole book. The idea of a supernatural fox-pseudo human going to space to save her brother while is such an enticing premise that is fully realized in this book. She possesses many shades of grey that make the reader question her moral values and the decisions she makes, going so far as to have them decide whether she can even be considered a good character in the first place. She is determined, rebellious, and willing to do anything, even abuse her shapeshifting abilities to pose as another individual. She deceives her closest friends and infiltrates a private room to find information about where her brother (the main motive) has gone. The reader's choice to decide whether or not she can be forgiven gives the book a more immersive feel to it and makes her character more relatable. The most interesting thing about her is her grey shades that leave the reader One of the book's biggest strengths is its worldbuilding elements. The world itself is full of supernatural creatures and is so fully realized it feels almost real. Part of the reason for this is the fact that it's able to reflect real-world prejudices in a realistic manner that mirrors prejudices of our own. In this book, fox species are frowned upon as deceptive and cunning, and while it's a nice nod to Zootopia (ha), it manages to be different from that with its sci-fi theming and setting that takes place in the confines of a military-like spaceship. The Korean mythology that is implemented in this futuristic setting feels so incredibly creative and mind-blowing at times, as the parallels between the legends and the events of the book are so cleverly executed. However, there are some serious criticisms that I feel should be addressed about this book. The book seems to drag on and on forever and is riddled with poor pacing. Lots of patience is needed to go through this book as the "high-octane thrills" that are promised on the cover only come occasionally. This is likely due to the setting, which is restricted within the spaceship. Although Kim Min has lots of drive behind her, the rate at which the goals themselves are accomplished sometimes happens at a staggeringly slow pace. The characters spend lots of their time expressing their opinions on previous events in the book or spend a long time contemplating what to do. And when the destination is finally reached, it doesn't feel fulfilling. The brother Kim spends so many pages looking for is actually in the book for only twenty pages/ The first and last act of the book is where it truly manages to shine as that's where it feels most appropriately paced. Some side plots also unnecessarily intrude in the main story. Kim's two best friends, Haneul and Sujin, are not expanded to their full potential and while they start off strong, get less and less developed as the book drags on. The villain also feels one-dimensional at times, with the generic "I'll take over the world using this epic powerful item" trope. Even Jun, Kim's brother, struggles as a character with the same problems and lack of a proper arc. Jang, the ghost out for revenge, is the only other character that actually feels fleshed out enough. Overall, this book is good. That much is true. It has a fully-realized world and protagonist that is hindered by poor pacing and side characters. But hey. That's just my opinion. If you're patient, go enough and read it. 3/5.
    6 days ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic has read this book.
    By Yoon Ha Lee
    6 days ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer.
    Although the book progresses mostly on a lighter note, “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” focuses the spotlight on many taboo subjects for young adult novels. With central topics like feminism, racism, illegal immigration, political outbreaks, drug abuse, and child abuse, John Grisham manages to effectively prod at touchy subjects with so much subtlety within each subplot, that even with lots of murder, smoking, and court cases scattered throughout the plot, through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Theodore Boone, “Kid Lawyer” is surprisingly appropriate. And with all of these dark themes, it comes as no surprise that there is indeed a lot to learn in this book. Each subplot takes the reader into a new and unexplored road, and although a suspenseful cliffhanger is presented towards the end of the book, the author still manages to quietly tie all of these themes up. This results in the reader feeling like they’ve actually read a complete book instead of a book with several different subplots, although that is precisely how it feels while reading it. John Grisham’s “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” is many different things. Sometimes it’s a fight for justice, sometimes it’s a heart-wrenching story of family situation infused with drug and child abuse, sometimes it’s a guidebook on the court’s rules, and sometimes it’s about a murder-witnessing illegal immigrant’s unwillingness to provide the town with justice for fear of getting caught in the middle.
    9 months ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic added a book review.
    Although the book progresses mostly on a lighter note, “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” focuses the spotlight on many taboo subjects for young adult novels. With central topics like feminism, racism, illegal immigration, political outbreaks, drug abuse, and child abuse, John Grisham manages to effectively prod at touchy subjects with so much subtlety within each subplot, that even with lots of murder, smoking, and court cases scattered throughout the plot, through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Theodore Boone, “Kid Lawyer” is surprisingly appropriate. And with all of these dark themes, it comes as no surprise that there is indeed a lot to learn in this book. Each subplot takes the reader into a new and unexplored road, and although a suspenseful cliffhanger is presented towards the end of the book, the author still manages to quietly tie all of these themes up. This results in the reader feeling like they’ve actually read a complete book instead of a book with several different subplots, although that is precisely how it feels while reading it. John Grisham’s “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” is many different things. Sometimes it’s a fight for justice, sometimes it’s a heart-wrenching story of family situation infused with drug and child abuse, sometimes it’s a guidebook on the court’s rules, and sometimes it’s about a murder-witnessing illegal immigrant’s unwillingness to provide the town with justice for fear of getting caught in the middle.
    9 months ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic added a book review.
    Although the book progresses mostly on a lighter note, “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” focuses the spotlight on many taboo subjects for young adult novels. With central topics like feminism, racism, illegal immigration, political outbreaks, drug abuse, and child abuse, John Grisham manages to effectively prod at touchy subjects with so much subtlety within each subplot, that even with lots of murder, smoking, and court cases scattered throughout the plot, through the eyes of thirteen-year-old Theodore Boone, “Kid Lawyer” is surprisingly appropriate. And with all of these dark themes, it comes as no surprise that there is indeed a lot to learn in this book. Each subplot takes the reader into a new and unexplored road, and although a suspenseful cliffhanger is presented towards the end of the book, the author still manages to quietly tie all of these themes up. This results in the reader feeling like they’ve actually read a complete book instead of a book with several different subplots, although that is precisely how it feels while reading it. John Grisham’s “Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer” is many different things. Sometimes it’s a fight for justice, sometimes it’s a heart-wrenching story of family situation infused with drug and child abuse, sometimes it’s a guidebook on the court’s rules, and sometimes it’s about a murder-witnessing illegal immigrant’s unwillingness to provide the town with justice for fear of getting caught in the middle.
    9 months ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic has read this book.
    9 months ago
  • icecream13
    icecream13 added a new comment in
    I think people will take interest in this book because it has a lot of weird facts and usually kids like it when they read weird things. I hope other kids like this book as much as I do
    About 1 year ago
  • theindiancritic
    theindiancritic's book review was featured in Heat.
    The “No-Neck”, fire hydrant-shaped yet graceful, loyal, chatterbox, (drum roll), Manny, is by far my most favorite character in the book. He’s been sent by the angels to help Michael in Michael’s dark times of distress. Michael knows that a world without Manny is like pizza without the cheese. If Manny weren’t there for Michael, what would become of him? They do everything together, and Manny is willing to do anything for Michael. What more could a friend want than Manny? He’s a very relatable character; you’ve probably got one of these Manny’s in your life. One reason specifically why I like Manny so much is because he’s a lot like me. We’re both huge chatterboxes and crack jokes in unnecessary situations. He’s the finishing masala to the book, which of course would never be complete with Manny. “Heat” without Manny would be a heart-wrenching tragedy story, with Michael constantly under clouds. The comedy factor combined with the drama is what makes “Heat” so special, and Manny is the definition of comedy, of course. He’ll lift his head up in the darkest of situations and is always by Michael’s side. Neither of them knows it, but deep down they are as close as brothers, Manny only being second to baseball for Michael.
    Over 1 year ago

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