somebody's Activity (5)

  • somebody
    somebody added a book review.
    A china doll named Edward was owned by Abilene Tulane, a young, rich girl who loved Edward, and played with him all of the time. But when Abilene went on a cruise with her family, Edward was accidentally thrown overboard. Months, maybe even years later, he was caught by a fisherman, made in to a scare crow, taken by a hobo at the dump, and even held in the arms of a poor, sick girl who was living with her brother in a shack. But over all of this time, Edward turned in to someone who loved, listened, and went through many adventures with various people who showed him their lives and helped him learn the true meaning of love.
    Over 8 years ago
  • somebody
    somebody added a book review.
    “Tuesdays with Morrie” is really a very touching book. The author of this wonderfully described book is Mitch Albom. However, there is another writer who in a way helped Mitch construct the book: Albom’s old professor, Morrie Schwartz, the hero of this book. In the story, the author had lost contact with his college professor (Morrie) for nearly 20 years. But then one day, when Mitch saw Morrie again on the television, he found out that Morrie has Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). It was terminal by the time he had discovered the disease and he was going to die within a year. Caring about Morrie, the author came back to his professor again, and the last class of the professor began. It took place once a week, every Tuesday, in his house. The student was the author. The subject of the class was the meaning of life. It was taught from experience, not school learnings. The author wrote their class into a book-“Tuesdays with Morrie”- and it is the “final gift” for Morrie. I love this book. This is the book in which has impressed me most among all books I have read, probably because of Morrie. He was brave, optimistic and humorous. When he was facing the illness, he suffered great pain and he needed to be totally dependent on others. It was also very depressing for him to know that he was going to die soon. But instead of mourning and grieving, Morrie tried to live happily and meaningfully. He said jokes to delight others. He also thought himself to be very lucky despite his illness because he had love from his relatives and friends. He knew how to find what he had instead of keep thinking how unlucky he was. It was very difficult. In addition, Morrie was very clever, sensible and knew what he needed. He would not follow blindly the culture-chasing after, work for money only and neglect the most important thing in the world: love. He was able to realize that the culture was not right and tried to teach people to think what was really important to them, so that they will not wait until they are dying before they know what they need most is love, and money cannot provide comfort. Even when he was dying, he continued to do so by helping the author to write this book. It also showed that he cared for people he did not know and he used every minute of his life to do meaningful things. That’s why I respect him so much. This book includes the fourteen classes they had and each covered a topic, for example, forgiveness, family, the world. From these lessons, I have learned the importance of love. Anyway, the most important thing I have learned is that I have found my aim. In this book, the scene that impressed me most was that on the last Tuesday, Morrie was dying and he said goodbye to Mitch. Mitch cried, in his first time for many years. It was really touching by seeing the intense love between them, like a real father and a son. It definitely set a good example of how to love. The author has made this a good book by writing it well, through which the lessons of Morrie are taught more impressively. First, throughout the book, in between the last 14 lessons of Morrie, the author would include dome incidents happened about Morrie and Mitch 20 years ago. That made a comparison between the present and the past and we can know more about the old professor before he got the illness. Also, it occasionally quoted some famous speech related to the topic so that the lessons could be more poetic and impressive. Moreover, the author did not try to describe how much the professor suffered, how popular he was or how optimistic he was directly. Instead, he only expressed all these through the speech and behavior of the characters so that your heart is deeply touched by the truth. There are a lot of writing skills we can learn. After reading this book I was touched deeply and I have learnt a lot of thing. It helped me to start a new life, a more meaningful life as I have found what I really need in this book. That is love, and the love in this book has made me feel very warm. You must read this book! I am sure you can learn something from it. The Tuesday lessons of life were not just for the author, yet for all of us. It was the precious gift from Morrie before he passed, just like when the author said, “Though Morrie had died, his love and spirit rem ain, and the teaching goes on.” MITCH ALBOM: In 1997, Albom published Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson. The book was the result of his visits with his former professor, Morrie Schwartz. While a student at Brandeis University, Albom was strongly influenced by the unique Professor Schwartz, a remarkable teacher with unusual teaching methods. He was that rare teacher who developed a close rapport with his students. Albom promised to keep in touch with Schwartz after graduation but, over the next sixteen years, didn't call or visit. Watching television one night, he saw Schwartz on ABC's Nightline. The professor had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. A hasty trip to Massachusetts to see his old friend and mentor led to weekly meetings during the rest of Schwartz's life. Rich with emotions, Tuesdays with Morrie is a memorial to a wise mentor. It resembles a conversation between the two, with Schwartz passing on life lessons to his former student. Albom was struck by the realization that although he was young, healthy and successful, his friend and teacher, who was dying, was a happier, more peaceful person. Albom re-evaluated his own priorities, coming to terms with his workaholic ambitions and the feeling that he had lost sight of things of real value. He wrote about how, without even realizing it, he had slowly abandoned his youthful ideals to become cynical, shallow and materialistic. In his final days, Professor Schwartz helped his former student to re-focus his life, to slow down and to enjoy the moment. Morrie Schwartz died in November of 1995. Albom used his publishing advance from Doubleday to help pay his friend's outstanding medical bills and has split the subsequent royalties with Schwartz's family.
    Over 8 years ago
  • somebody
    somebody added a book review.
    “Tuesdays with Morrie” is really a very touching book. The author of this wonderfully described book is Mitch Albom. However, there is another writer who in a way helped Mitch construct the book: Albom’s old professor, Morrie Schwartz, the hero of this book. In the story, the author had lost contact with his college professor (Morrie) for nearly 20 years. But then one day, when Mitch saw Morrie again on the television, he found out that Morrie has Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). It was terminal by the time he had discovered the disease and he was going to die within a year. Caring about Morrie, the author came back to his professor again, and the last class of the professor began. It took place once a week, every Tuesday, in his house. The student was the author. The subject of the class was the meaning of life. It was taught from experience, not school learnings. The author wrote their class into a book-“Tuesdays with Morrie”- and it is the “final gift” for Morrie. I love this book. This is the book in which has impressed me most among all books I have read, probably because of Morrie. He was brave, optimistic and humorous. When he was facing the illness, he suffered great pain and he needed to be totally dependent on others. It was also very depressing for him to know that he was going to die soon. But instead of mourning and grieving, Morrie tried to live happily and meaningfully. He said jokes to delight others. He also thought himself to be very lucky despite his illness because he had love from his relatives and friends. He knew how to find what he had instead of keep thinking how unlucky he was. It was very difficult. In addition, Morrie was very clever, sensible and knew what he needed. He would not follow blindly the culture-chasing after, work for money only and neglect the most important thing in the world: love. He was able to realize that the culture was not right and tried to teach people to think what was really important to them, so that they will not wait until they are dying before they know what they need most is love, and money cannot provide comfort. Even when he was dying, he continued to do so by helping the author to write this book. It also showed that he cared for people he did not know and he used every minute of his life to do meaningful things. That’s why I respect him so much. This book includes the fourteen classes they had and each covered a topic, for example, forgiveness, family, the world. From these lessons, I have learned the importance of love. Anyway, the most important thing I have learned is that I have found my aim. In this book, the scene that impressed me most was that on the last Tuesday, Morrie was dying and he said goodbye to Mitch. Mitch cried, in his first time for many years. It was really touching by seeing the intense love between them, like a real father and a son. It definitely set a good example of how to love. The author has made this a good book by writing it well, through which the lessons of Morrie are taught more impressively. First, throughout the book, in between the last 14 lessons of Morrie, the author would include dome incidents happened about Morrie and Mitch 20 years ago. That made a comparison between the present and the past and we can know more about the old professor before he got the illness. Also, it occasionally quoted some famous speech related to the topic so that the lessons could be more poetic and impressive. Moreover, the author did not try to describe how much the professor suffered, how popular he was or how optimistic he was directly. Instead, he only expressed all these through the speech and behavior of the characters so that your heart is deeply touched by the truth. There are a lot of writing skills we can learn. After reading this book I was touched deeply and I have learnt a lot of thing. It helped me to start a new life, a more meaningful life as I have found what I really need in this book. That is love, and the love in this book has made me feel very warm. You must read this book! I am sure you can learn something from it. The Tuesday lessons of life were not just for the author, yet for all of us. It was the precious gift from Morrie before he passed, just like when the author said, “Though Morrie had died, his love and spirit rem ain, and the teaching goes on.” MITCH ALBOM: In 1997, Albom published Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson. The book was the result of his visits with his former professor, Morrie Schwartz. While a student at Brandeis University, Albom was strongly influenced by the unique Professor Schwartz, a remarkable teacher with unusual teaching methods. He was that rare teacher who developed a close rapport with his students. Albom promised to keep in touch with Schwartz after graduation but, over the next sixteen years, didn't call or visit. Watching television one night, he saw Schwartz on ABC's Nightline. The professor had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. A hasty trip to Massachusetts to see his old friend and mentor led to weekly meetings during the rest of Schwartz's life. Rich with emotions, Tuesdays with Morrie is a memorial to a wise mentor. It resembles a conversation between the two, with Schwartz passing on life lessons to his former student. Albom was struck by the realization that although he was young, healthy and successful, his friend and teacher, who was dying, was a happier, more peaceful person. Albom re-evaluated his own priorities, coming to terms with his workaholic ambitions and the feeling that he had lost sight of things of real value. He wrote about how, without even realizing it, he had slowly abandoned his youthful ideals to become cynical, shallow and materialistic. In his final days, Professor Schwartz helped his former student to re-focus his life, to slow down and to enjoy the moment. Morrie Schwartz died in November of 1995. Albom used his publishing advance from Doubleday to help pay his friend's outstanding medical bills and has split the subsequent royalties with Schwartz's family.
    Over 8 years ago
  • somebody
    somebody has read this book.
    By Mitch Albom
    Over 8 years ago
  • somebody
    somebody has read this book.
    Over 8 years ago

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