tendergalaxy's Activity (442)

  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants's book review was featured in Gulliver's Travels.
    Gulliver's Travels gives an account of an Englishman (Gulliver, of course) who goes on voyages but is very unlucky. He meets (famously) Liliputians, the small people; Brobdinagians (the big people); Laputans and Balinarbians; and Hounyhnms, the virtuous talking horses. Through these travels, Jonathan Swift, the Irish writer of satire, weaves in criticisms of the world during the 18th century, criticizing the following: Whigs, Hanoverians, people from the Netherlands, and Europeans. It is interesting to read all the brilliant sarcastic ways things are allegorized in this book. The sheer absurdity of some events was diverting too. For example, LIliput battles its rival, Blefuscu based solely on the "correct" method of cracking eggs, and Gulliver urinates on the place in a noble attempt to put out a fire, and is promptly sentenced to blinding and slow starvation. Of course, you will have to read the book to realize all of its brilliance. But as this book does not have dialogue, only long monologues without even quotation marks, and because the sentences are long, and semicolons put in at strange places, this is not so quick to read. This, I know, will detract from the reading experience of some. But if you are prepared, you should read these pages and bask in its deep glory, irony, and wit. I especially recommend it to people who like reading classics or are prepared to think while they are reading. Lastly, I recommend that you read it with some footnotes to understand political references, such as the Sterling Edition, which also has good printing and large font.
    About 3 hours ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants added a book review.
    Gulliver's Travels gives an account of an Englishman (Gulliver, of course) who goes on voyages but is very unlucky. He meets (famously) Liliputians, the small people; Brobdinagians (the big people); Laputans and Balinarbians; and Hounyhnms, the virtuous talking horses. Through these travels, Jonathan Swift, the Irish writer of satire, weaves in criticisms of the world during the 18th century, criticizing the following: Whigs, Hanoverians, people from the Netherlands, and Europeans. It is interesting to read all the brilliant sarcastic ways things are allegorized in this book. The sheer absurdity of some events was diverting too. For example, LIliput battles its rival, Blefuscu based solely on the "correct" method of cracking eggs, and Gulliver urinates on the place in a noble attempt to put out a fire, and is promptly sentenced to blinding and slow starvation. Of course, you will have to read the book to realize all of its brilliance. But as this book does not have dialogue, only long monologues without even quotation marks, and because the sentences are long, and semicolons put in at strange places, this is not so quick to read. This, I know, will detract from the reading experience of some. But if you are prepared, you should read these pages and bask in its deep glory, irony, and wit. I especially recommend it to people who like reading classics or are prepared to think while they are reading. Lastly, I recommend that you read it with some footnotes to understand political references, such as the Sterling Edition, which also has good printing and large font.
    About 3 hours ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants is reading this book.
    8 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants is reading this book.
    8 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants is reading this book.
    By William Shakespeare
    8 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants is reading this book.
    By William Shakespeare
    8 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants wants to read this book.
    By Jonathan Swift
    8 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants wants to read this book.
    By Alexandre Dumas
    8 days ago
  • zarkinpants
    zarkinpants's book review was featured in Finding the Worm (Twerp Sequel).
    Finding the worm has a complicated title, but it has heart. This story is about Julian, "Jules", Tweski, a Jewish person living in Flushing, Queens. It is a superb book, of decent writing. In the end, the themes in this book were very thought-provoking. The style, in regards to using many commas and ands, added to the experience of being a relatable book. A brief description: Quentin, "Quick Quentin", has a tumor. The kids on the block, Lonnie, Shlomo, Julian, Eric, and Howie, who live in the Dorado House or such named buildings, go on with their lives, and Julian, whose Bar Mitzvah is coming up, learns from the rabbi (a very good character with witty lines) about death. All the while, Julian Tweski records his thoughts about life and all the events that happen during this time. It was interesting reading a book that portrayed the 70s and life in New York so well, painting a vivid picture of the activities of those living in this time. Many of the landmarks described within this book I could find on the Internet; likewise with the baseball players. It's a sequel to the book TWERP but you don't have to read that one (it does give you some spoilers though). All in all, a sad and thoughtful book at the end, but some middle parts, describing their daily activities, were a little "meh". It is a contemplative realistic fiction book with good dialogue.
    About 1 month ago

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First BookCreate an AvatarWrote First Book ReviewWrote 10 Book ReviewsJoined National Geographic Kids Book Club

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zarkinpants

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