They Called Us Enemy

A stunning graphic memoir recounting actor/author/activist George Takei's childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during World War II. Experience the forces that shaped an American icon -- and America itself -- in this gripping tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love.

George Takei has captured hearts and minds worldwide with his captivating stage presence and outspoken commitment to equal rights. But long before he braved new frontiers in Star Trek, he woke up as a four-year-old boy to find his own birth country at war with his father's -- and their entire family forced from their home into an uncertain future.

In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten "relocation centers," hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard.

They Called Us Enemy is Takei's firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother's hard choices, his father's faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future.

What does it mean to be American? Who gets to decide? When the world is against you, what can one person do? To answer these questions, George Takei joins co-writers Justin Eisinger & Steven Scott and artist Harmony Becker for the journey of a lifetime.
Paperback, 208 pages
Published on July 16, 2019 by Top Shelf Productions
ISBN-10: 1603094504
ISBN-13: 9781603094504
1 Book Review
Add a Rating
  • swirlycool
    swirlycoolMonday, August 10, 2020 at 8:41 am55 stars
    Based on a true story, George Takei grew up during the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Due to the event, the U.S. deemed any individual who was of Japanese descent. Families were forced to leave their homes and ride on a train to who knows where. Upon their arrival, they were placed in assigned homes. George vividly remembers the heat that hit him when he entered the house. Using the resources available along with a sewing machine they brought against the rules, George Takei's mom made curtains, clothes, and other necessities that were not readily available in the house. After living in these houses in dreadful conditions that became home, there was a form families were brought to fill out. After being forced to live in these conditions because of their heritage, the questions asked were ludicrous. For instance, the questions included were asking if the person would fight in the war if they were called upon, and if they would leave everything to fight. Why would they fight for a country that forced them into these conditions due to racism? The people who answered no and no were moved to new houses with more security and guards. Later, the U.S. asked if they would like to go back to Japan or stay. George Takei and his family stayed. Later, near the moving of people going back to Japan, they learned the 7.S. had bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki. George Takei and his family went back to their original home, and he started his career in acting. He continued his acting career and became apart of Star Trek. Overal, this comic book was very interesting and it gave me more knowledge to what it was like during this time in history. I recommend this book to people who want to learn more about the Japanese camps during the bombing of Pearl Harbor.