alanius's Activity (5)

  • alanius
    alanius's book review was featured in The Time Machine.
    What if someone told you that time travel was possible; that you can journey to the past or venture into the future? The Time Traveler, whose name is never revealed, is an intelligent but extremely eccentric scientist who discovers that there are four known dimensions of space--which really only means that you can easily move up and down, left and right, forward and backwards, and through Time. As long as you have entire consciousness and speed, you can break its constraints move around it. And so the unnamed Time Traveler brings himself to the year 802,701--that’s 30 million years from his own time. When he finally finds his way to the future, he finds his home--London--to be gone. Every building that formed the city no longer stands--just structures that act as homes to a society of simple-minded and innocent creatures who call themselves the Eloi. But as he continues his stay with them, he notices strange things, things the Eloi won’t tell him about. Sinister ghost-like beings that come in the night --deep voids in the ground that lead into what seems like nothing, and why are the Eloi so deathly afraid of the dark?--but ultimately, no one tells the Time Traveler about what happened to the human race. Most science fiction books during that century--the 1800s--were centered around the entire idea of being able to travel through time, but H.G. Wells was the first to actually try to explain the science of moving through the dimension of duration. Most of you probably wouldn’t enjoy books written in 1895--that’s 119 years old-- but The Time Machine really is worth reading-- and its only a little less than a hundred pages long. You’ll find that the Time Traveler, especially, is one of the most interesting parts of the book because you get to understand the mind of a scientist--it makes you think like him when you look at the world. The Time Machine is a novel that stands the test of time and humanity. But if there’s one thing I didn’t love about this book is how Wells views the--truly haunting--fate of us. And he definitely deepened the meaning of The Time Machine with thought-provoking ideas people today haven’t really cared enough to think about--the idea that today’s problems such as rampant industrialization and especially class struggle, will carry on to the future even 800,000 years from now. And although it’s only fiction, the way Wells portrays the future can very well be true. The human race doesn’t end, of course--but something much worse happens; something inhumane. “It sounds plausible enough tonight,” says the Time Traveler, “but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning...for after the Battle comes quiet.”
    Over 4 years ago
  • alanius
    alanius added a book review.
    What if someone told you that time travel was possible; that you can journey to the past or venture into the future? The Time Traveler, whose name is never revealed, is an intelligent but extremely eccentric scientist who discovers that there are four known dimensions of space--which really only means that you can easily move up and down, left and right, forward and backwards, and through Time. As long as you have entire consciousness and speed, you can break its constraints move around it. And so the unnamed Time Traveler brings himself to the year 802,701--that’s 30 million years from his own time. When he finally finds his way to the future, he finds his home--London--to be gone. Every building that formed the city no longer stands--just structures that act as homes to a society of simple-minded and innocent creatures who call themselves the Eloi. But as he continues his stay with them, he notices strange things, things the Eloi won’t tell him about. Sinister ghost-like beings that come in the night --deep voids in the ground that lead into what seems like nothing, and why are the Eloi so deathly afraid of the dark?--but ultimately, no one tells the Time Traveler about what happened to the human race. Most science fiction books during that century--the 1800s--were centered around the entire idea of being able to travel through time, but H.G. Wells was the first to actually try to explain the science of moving through the dimension of duration. Most of you probably wouldn’t enjoy books written in 1895--that’s 119 years old-- but The Time Machine really is worth reading-- and its only a little less than a hundred pages long. You’ll find that the Time Traveler, especially, is one of the most interesting parts of the book because you get to understand the mind of a scientist--it makes you think like him when you look at the world. The Time Machine is a novel that stands the test of time and humanity. But if there’s one thing I didn’t love about this book is how Wells views the--truly haunting--fate of us. And he definitely deepened the meaning of The Time Machine with thought-provoking ideas people today haven’t really cared enough to think about--the idea that today’s problems such as rampant industrialization and especially class struggle, will carry on to the future even 800,000 years from now. And although it’s only fiction, the way Wells portrays the future can very well be true. The human race doesn’t end, of course--but something much worse happens; something inhumane. “It sounds plausible enough tonight,” says the Time Traveler, “but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning...for after the Battle comes quiet.”
    Over 4 years ago
  • alanius
    alanius added a book review.
    Birdsall created a story for each of her characters, making it so easy to relate with at least one of them--and the bonds and breaks between each of them could make a dumb rock feel the way readers will. "The Penderwicks" began Summer for me---I've never read another book which made me feel the fun and adventure that comes with the holidays.
    Over 4 years ago
  • alanius
    alanius has read this book.
    By H G Wells
    Over 4 years ago
  • alanius
    alanius has joined a reading program.
    Over 4 years ago

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First BookCreate an AvatarWrote First Book ReviewJoined Summer Reading 2015

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