Frank Einstein and the Electro-Finger (Frank Einstein series #2): Book Two

Interest LevelReading LevelReading A-ZATOSWord Count
Grades 4 - 8Grades 3 - 5U4.415001
New York Times Bestseller

"Huge laughs and great science—the kind of smart, funny stuff that makes Jon Scieszka a legend."
—Mac Barnett, author of Battle Bunny and The Terrible Two

More clever science experiments, funny jokes, and robot hijinks await readers in book two of the New York Times bestselling Frank Einstein chapter book series from the mad scientist team of Jon Scieszka and Brian Biggs. The perfect combination to engage and entertain readers, the series features real science facts with adventure and humor, making these books ideal for STEM education. This second installment examines the quest to unlock the power behind the science of "energy."

Kid-genius and inventor Frank Einstein loves figuring out how the world works by creating household contraptions that are part science, part imagination, and definitely unusual. In the series opener, an uneventful experiment in his garage-lab, a lightning storm, and a flash of electricity bring Frank’s inventions—the robots Klink and Klank—to life! Not exactly the ideal lab partners, the wisecracking Klink and the overly expressive Klank nonetheless help Frank attempt to perfect his inventions. In the second book in the series, Frank is working on a revamped version of one of Nikola Tesla’s inventions, the “Electro-Finger,” a device that can tap into energy anywhere and allow all of Midville to live off the grid, with free wireless and solar energy. But this puts Frank in direct conflict with Edison’s quest to control all the power and light in Midville, monopolize its energy resources, and get “rich rich rich.” Time is running out, and only Frank, Watson, Klink, and Klank can stop Edison and his sentient ape, Mr. Chimp!

Integrating real science facts with wacky humor, a silly cast of characters, and science fiction, this uniquely engaging series is an irresistible chemical reaction for middle-grade readers. With easy-to-read language and graphic illustrations on almost every page, this chapter book series is a must for reluctant readers. The Frank Einstein series encourages middle-grade readers to question the way things work and to discover how they, too, can experiment with science. In a starred review, Kirkus Reviews raves, “This buoyant, tongue-in-cheek celebration of the impulse to ‘keep asking questions and finding your own answers’ fires on all cylinders,” while Publishers Weekly says that the series “proves that science can be as fun as it is important and useful.”

Read all the books in the New York Times bestselling Frank Einstein series: Frank Einstein and the Antimatter Motor (Book 1), Frank Einstein and the Electro-Finger (Book 2), Frank Einstein and the BrainTurbo (Book 3), and Frank Einstein and the EvoBlaster Belt (Book 4). Visit frankeinsteinbooks.com for more information.

 

Hardcover, 176 pages
Published on March 17, 2015 by Harry N. Abrams
ISBN-10: 141971483X
ISBN-13: 9781419714832
25 Book Reviews
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  • jeff12345
    jeff12345Wednesday, June 10, 2015 at 9:40 am
    It's ok, but It portrays an evil genius trying to stop a good genius.
    • namers
      namersWednesday, June 10, 2015 at 8:00 am22 stars
      Thank you to Dogo books for providing this book in exchange for an honest review. Frank Einstein has invented something he calls the "electro-finger". It uses the magnetic field of the Earth to provide wireless energy. However, T. Edison has been destroying all of the power plants in the area so that his generator will be the only energy source. T. Edison is planning to charge a lot of money for his energy, and wants to take over the world. This book has a lot of cool and interesting facts, diagrams, and illustrations. It was not, however, the most scintillating read. I got a little bored, but I think that this would be a great educational read for 3rd or 4th graders.
      • no accountTuesday, April 14, 2015 at 1:42 pm
        I have rea d the first book but not this
        • aquaninja
          aquaninjaMonday, April 13, 2015 at 1:15 pm55 stars
          I really like this book, you gotta try it. (But you should read the first book before you read this.)
          • I LIKE MILKFriday, April 10, 2015 at 8:06 amFeatured
            Frank Einstein invents something he calls the "electro finger," and he wants to use it to power his town. The only thing stopping him is a chimp and a boy named T. Edison. They are trying to destroy all of the towns power plants and Frank's plan. Along with the story, were some cool and interesting diagrams showing how different kinds of power sources work. (solar panels, windmills, etc.) The story was a bit slow at the beginning, but the pace picked up towards the end. This book is recommended to anyone at least under 10 or 11 to anyone who wants to read a funny, exciting book to read.
            • sleepyhead
              sleepyheadThursday, April 9, 2015 at 1:56 pm
              great book
              • readfreak
                readfreakMonday, April 6, 2015 at 6:05 am22 stars
                I think this book would be good for little kids. Maybe 3rd or 4th grade but for me, it was kind of silly. And not very funny.
                • cinnamon
                  cinnamonThursday, April 2, 2015 at 1:17 pm55 stars
                  i really want to read this book!
                  • Whats UpTuesday, March 31, 2015 at 6:19 amFeatured
                    Frank Einstein invents something he calls the "electro finger," and he wants to use it to power his town. The only thing stopping him is a chimp and a boy named T. Edison. They are trying to destroy all of the towns power plants and Frank's plan. Along with the story, were some cool and interesting diagrams showing how different kinds of power sources work. (solar panels, windmills, etc.) The story was a bit slow at the beginning, but the pace picked up towards the end. This book is recommended to anyone at least under 10 or 11 to anyone who wants to read a funny, exciting book to read.
                    • It is okaySaturday, March 28, 2015 at 10:20 am
                      It is okay