Farewell to Manzanar; A True Story of Japanese American Experience During and After the World War II Internment

Interest LevelReading LevelReading A-ZATOSWord Count
Grades 7 - 10Grades 6 - 12Z6.7n/a
Jeanne Wakatsuki was seven years old in 1942 when her family was uprooted from their home and sent to live at Manzanar internment camp--with 10,000 other Japanese Americans. Along with searchlight towers and armed guards, Manzanar ludicrously featured cheerleaders, Boy Scouts, sock hops, baton twirling lessons and a dance band called the Jive Bombers who would play any popular song except the nation's #1 hit: "Don't Fence Me In."



Farewell to Manzanar is the true story of one spirited Japanese-American family's attempt to survive the indignities of forced detention . . . and of a native-born American child who discovered what it was like to grow up behind barbed wire in the United States.


From the Paperback edition.
Hardcover
Published on October 1, 1973 by Houghton Mifflin (Juv)
ISBN-10: 0395172152
ISBN-13: 9780395172155
4 Book Reviews
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  • booksMonday, January 29, 2018 at 1:46 pm
    I honestly think this book is going to be great.I have not read it but it looks great.The fact that it is true blows my mind up!!!
    • yumikothelewis
      yumikothelewisSunday, August 28, 2016 at 7:11 pm
      Noice review...
      • ikyra_marie
        ikyra_marieWednesday, March 12, 2014 at 4:01 pmFeatured
        This was actually a pretty decent book.It's about this young Japanese- American girl that lives with her brothers and sisters in Fresno, California.She gets treated different by everybody just because her race is japanese and she looks different.Her family then gets booted out of their home taking barely anything and are forced to get onto a bus to take them to an internment camp.They live an extremely hard life at the internment camp, living in the middle of the desert with wind blowing in their uncomfortable and unbareable living situations.They had to live in things called barracks, which were outside where all the dust could blow in.After a couple years living in these terrible conditions.The girl (Jeanne Watkatsuki Houston) and her family are finally able to move out of it with thousands and thousand of many other innocent Japanese americans who did absolutely no harm to anyone whatsoever.Just like how the african americans were taken as slaves and dubbed as dumb, and stupid, or as property because of race and skin color.Not fair at all.Jeanne goes to school, she has now grown up quite a bit and is no longer the scared, seven year old girl she was when her family got moved to the internment camp.She does batton twirling and other things.She makes friends with a girl and one day wants to join girl scouts.The next day the girl comes back and says no just because Jeanne is Japanese and is different then white people.The story then goes on and Jeanne becomes an adult and has her own kids,the story ends with her taking her kids on a road trip to visit the old,destroyed internment camp where she was basically held prisoner for no reason.It holds a lot of memories for her.I had to read tis book for summer read for English class and then write an essay on it.I really though it was an important book because it has to do with racial unfairness and injustice just because another person is different or their skin is a different color.That is the theme of this book.Overall,it was pretty well written, almost like a biographical kind of book and also historical too.Anyone who likes books or topics about history or world wars 1 or 2 would like this book.
        • frankiebaby
          frankiebabyMonday, May 5, 2014 at 4:03 pm
          long, good review